February 18, 2018

We want to thank all of you who participated in the Union’s Standby Contest. The purpose of the contest was to bring attention to how much work we do “for free”. No other flight attendant in the country sits “standby” without receiving any pay or credit. The top “winners” of the standby contest are below:

Duce Roddick 86

Shalanda Thomas 84

Cheyenne Boatman 73

The average number of unpaid/unknown standby days of the average in JFK and FLL was sixty days. This means that in 2017, the average CCM performed two full months of work for free. For those of you who didn’t know, our BCN based colleagues now receive pay for sitting standby.

February 14th marked the one-year anniversary your union’s leaders first sat down with the company to negotiate our contract, During the past year, other unions on property have obtained their collective bargaining agreements with much less resistance than we have encountered. 2018 is the year that we will double our efforts to put pressure on the company to negotiate a contract for the U.S. crew. Each day we work without a contract is another day we work as the lowest paid and least compensated international flight attendants in the country. That has to stop now.

We will be sending out the February newsletter shortly, so stay tuned. We hope all of you have a great Valentine’s Day. Fly Safe!

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC


January 23, 2018


January 7, 2018

Dear AFA Member,

The issues discussed in this union update are:

1. LAX-based crew members forced to waive their rights

2. Itemize your taxes!

3. Contribute to your retirement with a one-time contribution

4. Airport Standby (APS) is not allowed in JFK or FLL

5. NY State taxes for out-of-state residents

6. AFA’s 2nd letter to Norwegian COO regarding poor rostering

7. Scholarships available to AFA Members

LAX-based crew members forced to waive their rights

FLL and JFK crew members transferring to LAX and LAX-based new hires were mandated by OSM Aviation to sign forms waiving their rights as California workers. The Union is very upset with this because it unjustly strips away the rights of LAX crew members afforded to them by the state of California and it undermines Contract Negotiations between the Company and the Union. AFA’s Legal Department wrote a letter demanding that OSM Aviation rescind the requirement for LAX-based crew members to waive their rights. A copy of this letter is found below. As a reminder, any time you are asked by the Company to sign something, notify the Union immediately.

AFA letter to OSM Aviation

Itemize your taxes!

*TAX TIME* It’s time to do your taxes and for those if you who are in a hurry to get your $200 refund we ask you to please stop and consider the benefit of itemizing your taxes. Because most of our layovers are international, we are eligible to claim more of a reimbursement when we file our taxes. If you itemize your taxes, your $200 refund can turn into $2,000 if you itemize.

You can use several different websites to help you figure out the maximum amount you can claim by inputting your layovers throughout the year. The most popular per diem calculation websites are PerDiemCalcEZperdiem, and PerDiemMax.

When you calculate the total amount you can claim on your taxes with the above per diem websites you can either do your taxes yourself (there are instructions on the websites on how to input the numbers into TurboTax) or you can give those figures to your tax professional so she/he can claim it for you.

www.perdiemcalc.com

www.ezperdiem.com

www.perdiemmax.com

 Got a big tax refund? Contribute to your retirement with a one-time contribution.

Contributing to a 401(k) without a Company match is not the smartest financial move and until the Union negotiates a 401(k) match with the Company, you may be better off looking for retirement options elsewhere. If you’re like most Americans who make less than $135,000, one of the smartest things you can do is make contributions to a Roth IRA. If you didn’t get a chance to contribute to a Roth IRA in 2017, there is still time! Federal law allows you to make 2017 contribution to a Roth IRA before the tax deadline of April 17, 2018. As always, consult a financial advisor before making any final decisions on your retirement.

 Airport Standby (APS) is not allowed in JFK or FLL.

Your Union became aware that cabin crew members were being assigned airport standby in recent months. We wrote to the Health, Safety, and Environment Manager at Norwegian and they confirmed that airport standby is NOT allowed in the US bases because our crew rooms are not suitable for airport standby. If you are assigned airport standby, please notify the Union immediately. The LAX crew room is not yet finished and it’s undetermined whether or not it’s suitable for airport standby.

 NY State Taxes for out-of-state residents

Two months ago, OSM Aviation started deducting NY State taxes from all JFK-based crew members, regardless of their state of residency. It’s the Union’s understanding that out-of-state crew members are exempt from paying NY State Taxes and have spoken to the Company about this. They said their hands are tied because they were told by NY State that everyone had to pay NY State taxes, regardless of where they lived. The Union is looking into this issue with AFA Legal and we will provide you with another update soon. If you are JFK-based and not a resident of NY, whatever taxes you paid to NY State last year and this year can be refunded to you by filing out the Nonresident and Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return Form IT-203.

 AFA’s 2nd Letter to Norwegian’s COO regarding poor rostering.

Five months ago, on August 17, 2017, the AFA sent a letter to Norwegian’s Chief Operating Officer, Asgeir Nyseth, about poor rostering, over-hiring of crew members, and excessive standby days. All of these factors have had a detrimental effect on our paychecks. Many of you also wrote personal emails to Asgeir explaining the effect our poor rosters are having on our livelihood and our ability to pay our bills. To date, none of us have received a response from Asgeir, which prompted the Union to write another letter. Our 2nd letter to Asgeir asks that he meet with us to discuss solutions to the poor rostering problems we continue to face. A copy of the letter can be found below:

AFA letter to Asgeir

Scholarships available to AFA Members

Our union membership provides opportunities for at least three different scholarships, and the time for applying is now!

 AFA – This is a scholarship funded by AFA.  The deadline for applications is April 10, 2017.  Details to send to members are on the AFA website (http://www.afacwa.org/scholarships).

 CWA – This is the Joe Beirne Scholarship offered by CWA. The deadline for applications i s April 29, 201 7 .   Details on this scholarship are on the CWA website (http://www.cwa-union.org/pages/beirne).

 Union Plus – There is a suite of scholarships, educational discounts, and loans available for union members (https://www.unionplus.org/college-education-financing).  One additional “click” brings up the scholarship applications that may be submitted online by the deadline of January 31, 201 7.

In the next week, we will send out a Negotiations Update announcing a “Contest” to highlight the one (1) year we have been negotiating a contract. It’s been a very long and frustrating process for your Union’s negotiating committee and for you, the cabin crew, who have no control over your schedules and continue to work for wages far below what every other international carrier is paying their crew members. The issues we are fighting for in Contract Negotiations are important to us as CCMs and go to basic respect and dignity. Please wear your AFA pin and fly safe. 

 Sincerely,

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC
Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted


December 24, 2017

Dear AFA Member,

 The items discussed in this Union Update are:

 1)      Illegal retaliation against Union Officer

2)      Wear your AFA Pin—it is your legal right

3)      Poor Management Performance

4)      New Staff Travel/Standby Policy

5)      Comprehensive Negotiations Update and Road Shows starting January 2018

 1. Illegal Retaliation against Union Officer

 Last month, management removed the GI, SUP and CC designation from Union Officer Katarzyna Mroczek over a Facebook post she made. In October, Katarzyna advised CCMs in a private Facebook group that we need the protections of a union contract rather than more pointless base meetings. The company’s actions are illegal under the Railway Labor Act because Katarzyna’s statement is protected speech. The AFA Legal department has given the company a deadline to reverse the decision but they have not yet responded. As a result, the AFA will be filing a lawsuit against the company in Federal Court. We hoped the company would have agreed to avoid another legal battle, but as usual, diplomacy has not worked. We have, however, received full support from AFA members and our colleagues in Europe. We will keep you updated once the lawsuit is filed.

2. Wear your AFA Pin—it is your legal right!

It’s now time to show solidarity and wear your AFA pin. As stated in previous uniform guidelines, the union pin for U.S.-based cabin crew is a statutory right. The approved location on your uniform for the pin is your uniform jacket.

You have the legal right to wear your AFA pin today and for the rest of your career. If a member of management asks you to remove the pin, you must report this incident along with the manager’s name to the union immediately. Click on the link to the AFA Pin below to watch a video from AFA International President Sara Nelson explaining the importance of wearing your union pin: here.

3. Poor Management Treatment and Performance

The union has received reports of unfair and harassing treatment of members from management here in the U.S. The unfair treatment ranges from ignoring emails to harassing and intimidating behavior. The union has begun the process of collecting reports from cabin crew on these matters and it’s very important for you to contact us immediately if you feel that you have been treated unjustly.

4. New Staff Travel/Standby Policy

The initial reaction to the company’s discriminating staff travel policy was well-deserved. The outcry of employees all over the globe forced the company to immediately change their unfair and unjust policy to make it less discriminatory against single/unmarried employees. While the new/revised policy is not perfect, it’s a positive step in the right direction. As U.S. based cabin crew, we rely heavily upon the ability to bring friends with us while working due to our lack of days off and amount of vacation (10 days a year) versus other company employees (12 days off and at least 28 days of vacation a year). The company has also decided to start charging employees for staff travel (30 krone per flight plus a fuel surcharge) with the ability to increase the amount in the future. We know things may work differently in Europe, but charging employees to travel on our own airline isn’t right, even if it’s only a “nominal fee”. Until the company is able to offer competitive benefits that other airlines offer (e.g. ZED travel on other airlines or jump-seat agreements), your union is going to fight for a better staff travel policy in contract negotiations.

5. Comprehensive Negotiations Update and Road Shows starting January 2018

 In January, your union is going to release a comprehensive negotiations update that talks about what we have accomplished so far in negotiations. In this update, the union will also explain where we and the company currently stand on the outstanding issues yet to be agreed upon. Though we have sent summaries on negotiations sessions in our union updates, we plan on providing you with a chart to more easily demonstrate the full scope of what is going on in negotiations. We plan on updating the chart throughout 2018 so you can visually track the progress being made at the negotiating table.

At our last negotiations session in November, the union and the company discussed a new article “Reduction in Force/Furlough” but no progress has been made on any of our other outstanding articles. Our negotiations session in December was cancelled by the Federal Mediator because of lack of federal funding from the government. Our next negotiations session is scheduled in January, but that meeting may also be cancelled due to lack of federal funding.

Regardless of if the January meeting is cancelled or not, we will be sending out our status chart and holding base meetings to discuss the status of our contract negotiations in person as well as any other concerns or questions you may have. Attached is the current status of the negotiations.

We thank you for reading through this newsletter. Stay Unified. Stay Professional. Stay Courteous to each other. Most importantly, have a great holiday season and New Year!

Sincerely,

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC
Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted

 

Where are we in Negotiations?

Article 1: Scope

Union Position: US CCM jobs need protection as long as company operates in/out of the U.S.

Company Position: unknown

Status: Article not yet opened

Protection in case of merger/acquisition; defined flying for US-based CCMs.

Article 2: Definitions

Union Position: All terms in the contract need to be defined.

Company Position: In agreement for most definitions.

Status: Open – Ongoing

Defines all terms in the contract.

Note: The “Definitions” article is constantly modified throughout negotiations as new terms are introduced.

Article 3: Compensation

Union Position: CCMs need to be paid industry standard/average for the work they do and not suffer a loss of pay when the Company makes business decisions, e.g., over-hire crew or cancel flights.

Company Position: unknown

Status: Unopened

All items that are money related including monthly salary, rates of pay, and per diem, etc.

Article 4: Staff Travel

Union Position: CCMs need to be treated equally with other employee groups and should be charged more than required taxes and fees when traveling.

Company Position: Company wants the ability to make money off of CCMs—CCMs may pay more than passengers in some circumstances.

Status: Opened—No Progress

The policies and procedures for passive and ID travel.

Article 5: Hotels

Union Position: The Union wants certain layover requirements including more centrally located hotels and a larger crew discount for food.

Company Position: Wants to maintain the ability to put crew in any hotel they want, regardless of condition.

Status: Opened—No Progress

The requirements and conditions for crew hotels and layovers.

Article 6: Rostering

Union Position: A higher line guarantee (above 55 hours) for all rosters, a bidding system, and protection from cancellations and trips being taken away.

Company Position: unknown

Status: Unopened

All items that are scheduling/IOCC related.

Article 7: Special Qualification Cabin Crew

Union Position: A set of rules that dictate the terms and conditions for each particular qualification.

Company Position: unknown

Status: Unopened

The conditions that pertain exclusively to SCCMs, Check Flight Attendants, and Ground Instructors

Article 8: Crew Bases

Union Position: Crew should be able to transfer to crew bases as long as there is a vacancy; should be based on seniority.

Company Position: Wants to maintain the ability to pick and choose who transfers and when.

Status: Opened—No Progress

All topics related to crew bases including vacancies and new base opening.

Article 9: Vacation

Union Position: Crew Members should get more than 10 days of vacation; there needs to be a bidding process based on Seniority; vacation needs to be paid.

Company position: 10 days is equal to “2 weeks” vacation; vacation should continue to be “unpaid”.

Status: Opened—No Progress

The amount of vacation a CCM accrues each year and bidding process

Note: OSM just gave new FLL-based pilots 28 days vacation.

Article 10: Leaves

Union Position: CCMs should be given adequate time off for a when having a baby or for a serious illness.

Company Position: Wants to establish a 120-day maximum for all leaves, then terminate a crew member after time is up.

Status: Opened—Some Progress

All absences from work including short term and long term illness

Article 11: Seniority

Union Position: Seniority is essential for dictating many aspects of our job including days off, bidding (when available), vacation, and base transfers.

Company Position: Does not want to acknowledge seniority in any way, shape, or form.

Status: Opened—No Progress

Discusses the process by which Seniority is established and how it’s implemented

Note: Short Haul in Europe has a seniority lists for pilots and cabin crew; many processes are dictated by seniority.

Article 12: Furlough

Union Position: Union allows the Company to furlough/reduce the number of US-based Cabin Crew members, as long as there’s a reduction systemwide (including crew members in other countries).

Company Position: Company wants to be able to specifically lay off US-based cabin crew while at the same time maintain (or continue to hire) crew member in other countries.

Status: Opened—No Progress

The process by which a Company implements a reduction in force.

Article 13: Health/Safety

Union Position: Union wants to appoint CCMs to Company Health and Safety Committees.

Company Position: Company wants to circumvent the Union and appoint their own Health and Safety Representatives.

Status: Opened—No Progress

All issues regarding the health and safety of cabin crew members.

Article 14: General

Union Position: N/A (ongoing)

Company Position: unknown

Status: Unopened

Any subject or issue that doesn’t fit into any other category.

Article 15: Uniforms

Union Position: We want to maintain the same uniform and luggage allotment that we do currently.

Company Position: In agreement with the Union on all issues except for the union pin.

Status: Opened—No Progress

All items related to the Company issued uniform and luggage

Note: The only thing preventing this article from being agreed to is the Company wants language stating that the Union Pin is NOT allowed.

Article 16: Grievances & Board of Adjustment

Union Position: Wants a process for CCMs to be able to dispute discipline or any other disparate treatment from the Company including pay and scheduling issues.

Company: In agreement with the Union.

Status: Closed—Tentatively Agreed

The process by which a CCM disputes discipline or unfair treatment by the Company.

Article 17: Benefits

Union Position: Crew Members should be provided quality benefits commensurate with the industry standard.

Company Position: unknown

Status: Unopened

All items pertaining to the health and welfare benefits of cabin crew members.

Article 18: Training & other meetings

Union Position: CCMs need to be paid for training and scheduled in a consistent and fair manner, e.g., not over the holidays.

Company Position: unknown

Status: Unopened

Processes by which training events and other required company meetings are assigned

Article 19: Union Activities

Union Position: Requesting similar treatment and conditions for other Unions on Company property.

Company Position: Offering less-than standard terms, when compared to other Unions.

Status: Opened—Some Progess

Allows union to operate on Company property

Article 20: Union Security

Union Position: Every US-based Cabin Crew member will pay Union dues after contract is ratified; provisions for payroll deduction; want specific language agreed to

Company Position: Agreement in Principle; does not agree to specific language.

Status: Opened—No Progress

The collection of Union dues

Article 21: Duration

Union Position: No determination on contract length at this time.

Company Position: unknown

Status: Unopened

The length of time the contract lasts before a new one is negotiated.


October 31, 2017

Dear AFA Member,

The items discussed in this Union Update are:

1)      Negotiations update

2)      Cabin Crew Summit in Madrid

3)      Base meetings in JFK and FLL

4)      AFA Membership Applications and Membership Number

5)      New Communications Co-Chairs

6)      Negotiations Update v. Union Newsletter

7)      AFA Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is here for you

1)      Negotiations Update

Last week your negotiations team met in Fort Lauderdale in Federally supervised mediation for our first agreement.   During these negotiations we focused on the Grievance and System Board Sections, as well as Leaves of Absence and Safety.

We were able to reach Tentative Agreements on the Grievance and System Board articles which are the first Tentative Agreements we have reached so far.  These two articles are very important because they provide for a process for resolving disputes once a Contract is in place. You will be able to “grieve” any contractual violation—whether it be a discrepancy in pay or something disciplinary (anything from a verbal warning to a termination).  Right now, the company can impose discipline and a CCM has little recourse.  If you do not receive the remedy you’re satisfied with, you will have the option to move your grievance forward by utilizing the System Board article, which will result in a hearing by an outside arbitrator.  For those of you who are unaware, an arbitrator is a judge who resolves workplace disputes. You can read more about Grievance Resolution and the System Board of Adjustment HERE.

Normally by this point in negotiations we would have many more Tentative Agreements.   At our mediation session we have been crystal clear that the pace of these negotiations must pick up as CCMs want and deserve improvements now. We are pleased that this week we had one of our most productive sessions so far and will expect that to continue next time we meet.

Our discussions on Leaves of Absence and the Safety articles did not result in agreement although we pushed hard for fair treatment for Norwegian CCMs. In the Leave of Absence section, we objected to the Company’s position that CCMs should get the bare minimum legally required leave for instances of illness or childbirth.  This is especially troublesome knowing that our European counterparts are provided generous family leave and as a global airline we expect far better from Norwegian.

We are hoping management heard our message and if not, we are prepared to take our case to Norway and the rest of Europe if we need to.   This is not to mention that other US union contracts provide far more generous medical and maternity leave than what the company is offering. We have had Norwegian CCMs serious illness who were forced to resign which we think is inhumane. The company said they would revisit these issues at the next bargaining session so will report more in November.

Another important issue we are dealing with is safety.  First and foremost, we are Inflight Safety Professionals and safety is at the core of what we do as a union.  Thus far, the company is balking at recognizing the crucial role of our union as experts as safety professionals.   Again, we strongly advocated for our position and expect to have a lot more discussion with the Company at our November session.

2)      Cabin Crew Summit in Madrid

Union leaders representing Norwegian’s cabin crew in Europe and the United States met earlier this month in Madrid, Spain. The meeting was held on October 18th and 19th at the headquarters of Unión Sindical Obrera (USO), the trade union that represents the Company’s Spanish-based cabin crew. The meeting is a biannual global summit that aims to establish communication and coordination across all Norwegian cabin crew bases worldwide.

Our Company has expanded globally like no other airline before and it’s essential that the crew members from all countries communicate and coordinate our efforts. Whether we’re talking to the Company on minor issues or major issues (e.g. contract negotiations) it’s imperative that we know what’s going with our colleagues in different countries so we can prevent the Company from trying to manipulate us and use the strategy of “divide and conquer.” The only way we can improve our pay, working conditions, and job security is to ensure the bar is raised for everyone and prevent the Company from trying to force one particular group to accept inferior pay and working conditions.

Other than agreeing to meet biannually, we have started formulating a strategic plan. We are identifying the issues that affect each country’s employees as well as those that affect all employees globally, and we are developing strategies to address these issues and action plans. We have also established basic goals for the group that we are trying to achieve on local and global levels before our next meeting. The next scheduled meeting is planned for Spring 2018 in the United States and it will be hosted by the Association of Flight Attendants.

The joint-communication from the meeting with signatures can be found HERE.

3)      Base meetings in JFK and FLL

Earlier this month, Base Meetings were held by Norwegian and OSM Aviation in JFK and FLL. For those of you who have been here a while, you already know that these meetings provide nothing more than “lip service” to make it sound like progress is being made on important issues that affect the cabin crew. In actuality, Norwegian and OSM Management are required to hold these meetings by the authorities–not because they actually care what we have to say. If you had the opportunity to attend one of these meetings, you will know that little is being done to improve our Quality of Work Life. The only notable items mentioned in these meetings are items that the Union is currently fighting for in negotiations: an equitable Staff Travel and Vacation Bidding Policy. We continue to discuss both of these important items in negotiations. Lastly, Norwegian/OSM continue to ignore and redirect the issue of crew members being “topped out” and not receiving an additional raise to their salary after completing 4 years of service. Rather than flat out admit that they do not want to provide raises after 4 years, they say “talk to the Union” making it seem like the issue is completely out of their control. Norwegian/OSM has set up a 4-year pay scale for a very good reason: they do not want this job to be a long-term career for the cabin crew.

4)      AFA Membership Applications and AFA Membership Number

The majority of you have already filled out your AFA Membership Applications. In order for you to be able to vote on a Contract or for Union Officers, you need to be a Union Member. Signing an application does not mean you are immediately responsible for Union Dues. Right now, none of us are liable for Union Dues. AFTER a contract is negotiated, voted on, and approved by You, the Union Member,  everyone will be required to pay Union Dues,  regardless if they filled out a union application or not. If you haven’t already done so, send in your application today and make your vote count!

Other than being eligible to vote in Union Elections and attend Membership Meetings, being a member of the AFA makes you eligible for so much more: You and your family will be eligible for scholarships through AFA, CWA, and UnionPlus.  Also, through UnionPlus, AFA members are eligible for a wide range of benefits including discounts on travel and theme parks, specially discounted mortgages and credit cards, credit counseling, and legal assistance and advice. For more information, visit  www.unionplus.org or download the AFA UnionPlus flier here.

For those of you who already sent in your application, you have an official “Union Member Number” with the AFA. Your union member number is 7610 + your employee number +  A, so if your employee number is 12345, your union member number is: 761012345A. If asked, Norwegian Cabin Crew’s council designation in the Association of Flight Attendants is “Local Council 4.”

5)      New Communications Co-Chairs

The AFA Norwegian Air MEC has appointed two communications co-chairs, who will better assist you in getting the latest union information and become better informed. The MEC Communications Co-Chairs are JFK CCM Tom Hafner and FLL (future LAX) CCM Larry Stroud.

                      Tom Hafner                                     

6)      Negotiations Updates

In order to provide more up-to-date and substantive information about Negotiations, we have decided to publish to separate newsletters: one for Negotiations and one for all other Union Business. You will see the two separate newsletters starting next month.

7)      AFA Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is here for you

The world is a scary place and some of us deal with its challenges differently than others. AFA’s nationally acclaimed EAP provides free services to flight attendants, their families, and partners. Everyone experiences personal or work-related problems from time to time. Sometimes our own resources or sup­port systems just aren’t enough. We could all benefit from assistance from another source – one that you can trust and rely on for help. EAP can help you with: Relationship issues, family concerns, physical and emotional health concerns, stress, chemical dependency (e.g. drugs and alcohol), financial difficulties, and legal matters. EAP can help you deal with critical incidents or traumatic events you experience, whether at work or out of work.

EAP can also help you deal with problems among coworkers. There is an alternative to making a report to management if you have a conflict with, or concern about, a flying partner. Whenever you are involved in a professional standards matter, you are encouraged to address the issue in a reasonable and timely manner. Your EAP representative can help you with defusing the situation and achieving the outcome you desire.

Do you see a colleague who needs help but you just don’t know how to approach them. Call the EAP now to get them the help they need.

How do I access the EAP? Call the International helpline at 1-800-424-2406 or 202-434-0560 to help you access services.

 

We thank everyone for standing strong.  The issues we are fighting for are important to us as CCMs and go to basic respect and dignity.  We hope the progress in negotiations last week continues and if not, as part of the world’s largest Flight Attendant union, we will take our case to the media, government regulators, and Norwegian Air’s home turf.   Please wear your AFA pin and fly safe.

 

Sincerely,

 

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC
Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted
info@norwegianafa.org
(754) 216-3406


October 6, 2017

Dear AFA Member,

The items discussed in this Union Update are:

1)    National Mediation Board Meeting in D.C.

2)    Jumpseat Agreements

3)    Hotel Discounts

4)    Norwegian AFA Communications Chairperson application deadline

1)    National Mediation Board Meeting in D.C.

 Your AFA Negotiations Team and OSM Management was called to Washington, D.C. last month to explain why there has been no agreement on a single Contract Proposal since we started contract negotiations 8 months ago. We met alone with the Senior Mediator and explained that from day one, the Union passed across reasonable proposals that meet the industry standard and ensure the protection of wages, work rules, and benefits of our members. We also explained that although OSM Management has “budged” a little here and there, OSM Management continues to push back and propose vague and hallowed-out language that gives the Company full control to do what it wants. The following day the Senior Mediator met with OSM Management to hear their explanation of why no progress has been made. We are unsure of how the meeting between the Senior Mediator and OSM went, but we hope to see some progress starting with our next negotiations session later this month: Oct 24th-26th.

2)    Jumpseat Agreements

CEO Bjorn Kjos was asked at the One Norwegian Regional Event NYC about Jumpseat Agreements. Two years ago at a Company meeting near JFK airport, Bjorn said that we would have jumpseat agreements by the end of 2016. He said he “doesn’t remember” saying that and, “it doesn’t take an Einstein to figure out that the US carriers would not enter into a jumpseat agreement with Norwegian.” When asked if he would be open to the jumpseat agreements if the US carriers expressed interest, he dismissed the suggestion and also said that he “doesn’t want crew members commuting to work before duty because it’s a safety issue.” This statement is a little surprising because our LGW and BCN colleagues who don’t live in base are provided unlimited S2 (confirmed/positive space) tickets on Norwegian to commute to and from their home cities. Despite Bjorn’s disappointing response to the jump seat issue, the AFA will continue to press the issue with Norwegian management.

3)    Hotel Discounts

Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG) has provided the AFA with a special link for crew members to receive discounted rates at their hotels. IHG has over 5,000 hotels across nearly 100 countries. IHG brands include Candlewood Suites, Crowne Plaza, EVEN Hotels, Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn Express, Hotel Indigo, Hualuxe (China), InterContinental, Kimpton Hotels and Resorts and Staybridge Suites.

http://www.ihg.com/hotels/gb/en/global/offers/hotel/airline-employee?showStrikeThroughRate=true

IHG also provided a special “friends and family” link for those who aren’t crew members: http://www.ihgfriendsandfamily.com/znceu84

La Quinta Inns & Suites has also provided the AFA with a special discount code for crew members to receive discounted rates. La Quinta Inn & Suites is a chain of over 800 limited service hotels in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Honduras.
In the “Promo/Corporate Code” field, enter: AIRLE4

www.laquinta.com

4)    Norwegian AFA Communications Chairperson application deadline

The deadline to apply for the Norwegian AFA Communications Chairperson position ends October 15th. The position will be part-time, 5-20 hours per month depending on experience and skill set. Desired skills are previous communications and editing experience, proficiency in MS Publisher or equivalent application, proficiency in WordPress, and basic photography skills. This is a paid position.

We thank you for reading through this newsletter. Stay Unified. Stay Professional. Stay Courteous to each other.

Sincerely,

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC
Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted


September 12, 2017

 

Give To or Get Help From

the AFA-CWA Disaster Relief Fund for

Hurricanes Harvey & Irma

 

We know that disasters can change lives forever. While we can’t stop destructive events from happening, we can, as a Union, assist our members with their recovery. AFA established the Disaster Relief Fund after September 11th to assist our members whose lives were placed in harms way. AFA members and retirees, whose primary residence is in the counties listed below and who have suffered damage and/or dislocation, are eligible for $200.00 from the AFA-CWA Disaster Relief Fund.  It is a gift made possible by the generosity of your fellow union sisters and brothers with AFA.

Texas Counties:  Aransas, Bee, Brazoria, Calhoun, Chambers, Colorado, Fayette, Fort Bend, Galveston, Goliad, Hardin, Harris, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, Kleberg, Liberty, Matagorda, Montgomery, Newton, Nueces, Orange, Refugio, Sabine, San Jacinto, San Patricio, Victoria, Waller, Wharton

Florida Counties: Broward, Charlotte, Clay, Collier, Duval, Flagler, Hillsborough, Lee, Manatee, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Palm Beach, Pinellas, Putnam, Sarasota, St. Johns

If you would like to apply for AFA-CWA Disaster Relief Funds, visit www.afacwa.org/drf and download the Disaster Relief Fund Application and fax it to the International AFA EAP Department at 202-434-1411 or mail it to AFA-CWA EAP Department, 6th Floor, 501 Third Street NW, Washington D.C.  20001-2797.   You can also e-mail this same information requested to lfoster@afanet.org or phone in the necessary information to 1-800-424-2406.

If you wish to make a contribution either by check or electronic payment, please visit www.afacwa.org/drf for more information on donating.

 

Sincerely,

Sara Nelson, International President

Debora Sutor, International Vice President


September 8, 2017

Hurricane Irma is expected to hit South Florida early Sunday morning. All Norwegian flights for the next few days have been cancelled and your rosters should have been updated accordingly. After the hurricane passes, more information will be provided by the Company. If you have a flight scheduled next week and are unable to report for your flight, you must call IOCC as soon as practicable: 954-364-7740.

RIGHT NOW, you should only be focused on seeking safe shelter!

Evacuation orders have been issued for the following areas:

·        South Bay

·        Lake Harbor

·        Pahokee

·        Moore Haven

·        Clewiston

·        Belle Glade

·        Canal Point

·        Brevard – mandatory evacuations for Zone A, Merritt Island, barrier islands, and some low-lying mainland areas along Indian River Lagoon beginning Friday

·        Broward – voluntary evacuations mobile homes and low-lying areas; mandatory East of Federal Highway including barrier islands beginning Thursday

·        Collier – mandatory evacuations for Goodland, Everglades City, Chokoloskee, all mobile homes beginning on Friday

·        Flagler – mandatory evacuations for nursing homes, all varieties of assisted living facilities, and community residential group homes within coastal and Intracoastal areas and voluntary for zones A, B, C, F beginning on Thursday; mandatory for Zones A,B,C,F, and substandard housing beginning on Saturday

·        Hendry – voluntary evacuations for low-lying areas, non-slab-built homes, mobile home and RVs beginning on Thursday

·        Lee – mandatory evacuations for barrier islands – Bonita Beach, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel, Captiva, and Pine Island beginning on Friday AM

·        Manatee – voluntary evacuations for Zone A

·        Martin – voluntary evacuations for mandatory for barrier islands, manufactured homes, and low-lying areas beginning Saturday

·        Miami-Dade – mandatory evacuations for all of Zone A, all of Zone B, and portions of Zone C. Miami Dade residents can find their zones by clicking HERE.

·        Monroe – mandatory evacuations for visitors and residents. A dedicated transportation hotline is available specifically for individuals in the Keys at 305-517-2480

·        Palm Beach – mandatory evacuations for Zone A and B, voluntary for Zone C

·        Pinellas – mandatory evacuations all mobile home and Zone A

·        St. Lucie – voluntary evacuations

 

Evacuating locally to the home of a friend or family member OUTSIDE of the evacuation area is highly recommended. Staying within the evacuation area after being told to evacuate means that you’re putting your life at risk—especially if you’re in a location without hurricane impact windows or in a flood-prone zone. Hurricane Evacuation Centers should be utilized when you cannot find safe shelter outside of the evacuation area. Remember, evacuation centers are not designed for comfort and not all accept pets.

Search for open shelters by texting SHELTER and a ZIP CODE to 43362 (4FEMA). Example: Shelter 33304

Broward County has coordinated plans for 43 shelters that can accommodate up to 33,000 people. They have already begun accommodating evacuees, but please note that some shelters have already reached capacity. See below for more information on Broward County evacuation shelters.

Emergency Evacuation Routes and Zones

Emergency Shelter Options

Emergency Shelter Map

Residents are urged to familiarize themselves with the locations of the designated General Population Shelters. All of the locations selected as shelters have been built with safety standards or have been retrofitted to serve as shelters.

Locations include:
Coconut Creek Lyons Creek Middle School
4333 Sol Press Blvd.
Coconut Creek, FL 33073
From Lyons Rd & Wiles Rd. Intersection
Drive North onto Lyons Rd.
Turn Right onto Sol Press Blvd.
Total est. time: 3 minutes
Total est. distance: 1.98 miles

Served by BCT bus routes: 31 and 48
MAP   Coconut CreekMonarch High School
5050 Wiles Rd.
Coconut Creek, FL 33073From Wiles Rd. & US 441/State Rd. 7 Intersection
Drive East onto Wiles Rd.
(between Lyons Rd. & US 441/State Rd. 7)
Total est. time: 1 minute
Total est. distance: 0.57 miles

Served by BCT bus routes: 19 and 31
MAP   Coral SpringsCoral Glades High School
2700 Sportsplex Dr.
Coral Springs, FL 33065From Sample Rd. & University Dr. Intersection
Drive West on Sample Rd.
Turn Right onto Sportsplex Dr.
Total est. time: 8 minutes
Total est. distance: 3.38 miles

Served by BCT bus routes: 34 and 83
MAP   DavieFox Trail Elementary School
1250 Nob Hill Rd.
Davie, FL 33324From Broward Blvd. & Nob Hill Rd. Intersection
Drive South on Nob Hill Rd.
Make a U-turn at 101st Rd. onto Nob Hill Rd.
Total est. time: 3 minutes
Total est. distance: 1.29 miles

Served by BCT bus routes: 22 and 30
MAP   Fort LauderdaleAtlantic Technical (Arthur Ashe)
1701 N.W. 23rd Ave.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311From I-95/Oakland Park Blvd. Exit
Take Oakland Park Blvd. West
Turn Left onto N.W. 21st Ave.
N.W. 21st Ave. becomes N.W. 23rd Ave.
Total est. time: 4 minutes
Total est. distance: 1.89 miles

Served by BCT bus routes: 11 and 31
MAPFort LauderdaleRock Island Elementary
2350 N.W. 19th Street
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311MAP   Pembroke ParkWatkins Elementary School
3520 S.W. 52nd Ave.
Pembroke Park, FL 33023From I-95/ Hallandale Bch. Blvd.
Take Hallandale Bch. Blvd. West
Turn Left onto S.W. 52nd Ave.
Total est. time: 6 minutes
Total est. distance: 2.53 miles

Served by BCT bus routes: 15 and 28
MAP   Lauderdale LakesPark Lakes Elementary School
3925 N. State Rd. 7
Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33319From Oakland Park Blvd. & US 441/State Rd. 7 Intersection
Drive North onto US 441/State Rd. 7.
Total est. time: 1 minute
Total est. distance: 0.67 miles
Served by BCT bus routes: 19 and 441 Breeze

MAP   MiramarNew Renaissance Middle School
10701 Miramar Blvd.
Miramar, FL 33025From Pembroke Rd. & University Dr. Drive Pembroke Rd. West
Turn Left on S. Palm Ave./SW 101st Ave.
Turn Right onto S.W. 25th St./ Miramar Blvd.
Total est. time: 6 minutes
Total est. distance: 3.00 miles

Served by BCT bus routes: 5, 28 and 95 Express Pembroke Pines
MAP   MiramarEverglades High School
17100 SW 48TH CT
Miramar, FL 33027From I-75, West on Miramar Parkway
Turn Left onto SW 172nd Ave.
Turn Left onto SW 48th CT/Bass Creek Rd.
Total est. time: 4 minutes
Total est. dist: 2.10 miles

Served by BCT bus route 28
MAP   Pembroke PinesWest Broward High School
500 NW 209 Ave.
Pembroke Pines, FL 33029From I-75, West on FL-820 W/Pines Blvd.
Turn Right onto NW 209th Ave.
Total est. time: 9 minutes
Total est. dist: 6.28 miles
Served by BCT bus route: 7

MAP   PlantationPlantation Elementary School
651 N.W. 42nd Ave.
Plantation, FL 33317From Sunrise Blvd. & US 441/State Rd. 7 Intersection
Drive South on US 441/State Rd. 7
Turn Right onto N.W. 5th St.
Turn Right onto N.W. 42nd Ave.
Total est. time: 3 minutes
Total est. distance: 1.65 miles
Served by BCT bus routes: 18 and 81

MAP   Pompano BeachFULL CAPACITY
Pompano BeachHigh School
600N.E. 13 Ave.
Pompano Beach, FL 33060From I-95, EAST on W Atlantic Blvd./ FL-814 E
Turn LEFT onto NE 13th AVE.
Total est. time: 4 minutes
Total est. dist: 1.99 miles

Served by BCT bus routes: 10 and 42
MAP   WestonFalcon Cove Middle School
4251 Bonaventure Blvd.
Weston, FL 33332From I-75/ Griffin Rd. Exit
Take Griffin Rd. West
Turn Right onto Bonaventure Blvd.
Total est. time: 6 minutes
Total est. distance: 3.67 miles

Served by BCT bus route: 23
MAP

Company-provided Shelter

 

OSM has offered shelter for Norwegian Crew Members at the Norwegian Seamen’s Church/ Scandinavian Center in Davie, FL.

 

Davie Norwegian Seamen’s Church/

Scandinavian Center
2950 S. Flamingo Road
Davie, FL 33330

You can contact the Church at (786) 325-0794. The pastor of the Church is Audun.

MAP

 

Crew Hotel–Courtyard Aventura

The crew hotel in Aventura is considered a safe shelter, but is only for current guests of the hotel. Unless you’re invited by a crew member currently staying at the hotel, do not go here to seek shelter.

 

Pets in Shelters

Service animals are permitted in General Population Shelters so long as the pet meets the requirements under Federal law. Visit ADA Requirements for Service Animals for additional information. The Pet Friendly Shelter is available for residents owning pets that are not considered a service animal that live in evacuation areas or mobile homes. Residents who need to use the pet-friendly shelter at Millennium Middle School no longer need to pre-register to use the shelter.  Instead, residents can go directly to Millenium Middle School, 5803 NW 94th Avenue, Tamarac.

 

Residents need to bring proof of rabies vaccination and pet registration, a photo of their pet and proof of residency in Broward County. Pet owners must provide their own pet food and supplies.

 

To help expedite admission to the shelter, pet owners are encouraged to download and complete a registration form at http://humanebroward.com/pet-friendly-shelter/. The form can then be taken to Millenium Middle School.

 

Owners will be sheltered at Challenger Elementary School. Pets will be sheltered at Millennium Middle School. Facilities are adjacent.

 

To register, call the Humane Society at 954-989-3977.

Tamarac Pet-Friendly Shelter Only
Not a General Population Shelter

Millennium Middle School / Challenger Elementary School Campus
5803 NW 94th Ave.
Tamarac, FL 33321
From Commercial Blvd. & University Drive Intersection
Take Commercial Blvd. West
Turn Right onto 94th Ave.
Make a U-turn at N.W. 93rd Ter. onto 94th Ave.
Total est. time: 4 minutes
Total est. distance: 1.93 miles

Served by BCT bus route: 55
MAP

For more information

Hurricane tracking map (PDF) 

Hurricane Preparedness Guide

National Hurricane Center

 

Be safe and take care of yourself. We will send out more communication after the storm passes.

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC
Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted


August, 22 2017

Dear AFA Member,

The items discussed in this Union Update are:

1)      Contract Negotiations with OSM Aviation—ordered to D.C.
2)      Letter to Norwegian regarding our rosters.
3)      All in, Wear your Pin!
4)      Using the Union as an “excuse” not to raise wages.
5)      OSM Aviation fires JFK-based cabin crew after cancer treatment.
6)      Position opening—Norwegian AFA Communications Chairperson.

1)      Contract Negotiations with OSM Aviation—ordered to D.C.

Your AFA Negotiations Team met last week in Fort Lauderdale in federally supervised mediated contract negotiations.  At the session, we discussed the outstanding Contract Proposals with OSM Management. We weren’t able to reach an agreement any of the proposals.

Despite meeting with OSM Aviation since February, there has been no agreement on a single Contract Proposal. From day one, the Union passed across reasonable proposals that meet the industry standard and ensure the protection of wages, work rules, and benefits of our members. Though they have “budged” a little here and there, Management continues to push back and propose vague and hallowed-out language that gives the Company full control to do what it wishes.This is unacceptable to us.

As a result of the standstill, the federal Mediator has requested that both sides (your AFA Negotiations Team and OSM Aviation) fly to Washington, D.C. to explain why no agreement has been reached on any of the Contract Proposals. At this point in negotiations (6 months into bargaining) it’s extremely rare for both sides not to reach an agreement on any proposals and the Senior Mediator at the National Mediation Board will press both sides for an explanation. We will provide the date and time of the meeting once we receive the meeting notice from the NMB.

2)      Letter to Norwegian regarding our rosters

The monthly roster release continues to be disappointment which is affecting our ability to earn a decent paycheck. The AFA wrote a letter to the Chief Operations Officer of Norwegian Asgeir Nyseth to bring his attention to the ongoing problem with our rosters. Click below to see a copy of the letter:

Many of you wrote to our Company leaders telling them the hardships you’re experiencing with the current lack of flying; however, most of you have still not written in. If Norwegian management does not hear how bad things really are, they will continue to think that everything is fine. The main person to email is Asgeir Nyseth, the COO of Norwegian: Asgeir.Nyseth@norwegian.com.  In addition, you will want to add or “cc” the following individuals:

Jan.Dahm.Simonsen@norwegian.com;
Helene.Loeken@norwegian.com;
Katarina.Finneng@norwegian.com;
Lasse.Sandaker-Nielsen@norwegian.com;
Espen.Hoiby@osmaviation.com;
info@norwegianafa.org

3)      All in, Wear your Pin!

By now, all cabin crew members should have received a union pin in the mail. It’s now time to show solidarity and wear your AFA pin. As stated in previous uniform guidelines, the union pin for US-based cabin crew is a statutory right. The approved location on your uniform for the pin is your Uniform Jacket.

You have the legal right to wear your AFA pin today and for the rest of your career! Click on the image of the AFA Pin below to watch a video from AFA International President Sara Nelson explaining the importance of wearing your union pin:

4)      Using the Union as an “excuse” not to raise wages

On more than one occasion, OSM Management has used “the Union” an excuse to not provide improvements. When crew members have asked OSM Management about the continuation of the part-time program, a long-deserved 401(k) match, or an increased in pay after “Year 4,” the Union has been used an excuse not to provide these things because we are currently in “Negotiations.” While it’s true that all wages and working conditions will eventually be dictated by our Union Contract, there’s nothing to stop the Company from providing any improvements now, especially at a time when many of our paychecks are suffering.

5)      OSM Aviation fires JFK-based cabin crew after cancer treatment

Many of you have seen the Norwegian newspaper article on RedNose talking about a JFK-based cabin crew member who was fired after her cancer treatment. This is a true story. OSM Management won’t talk about the situation because they say it’s a “personnel matter,” but we know that the crew member did not have any discipline in her file and she was fired right after her 90-day Family Medical Leave expired. We are disappointed to hear about this story because in most circumstances, employers give the employee year or more to recover from such illness. Click on the image below to link to the newspaper article. You will need to open the link in Google Chrome or manually translate the article because it’s written in Norwegian. We will soon start a fundraiser for the fired cabin crew member, as she’s a single mom taking care of her kids as well as her ill parents.

6)      Position opening—Norwegian AFA Communications Chairperson

Your AFA leaders are looking for JFK or FLL based cabin crew member to fulfill the position of Communications Chairperson. The position will be part-time, 5-20 hours per month depending on experience and skill set. Desired skills are previous communications and editing experience, proficiency in MS Publisher or equivalent application, proficiency in WordPress, and basic photography skills. This is a paid position.

We thank you for reading through this newsletter. Stay Unified. Stay Professional. Stay Courteous to each other.

Sincerely,

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC
Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted


July 14, 2017

Dear AFA Member,

In this update, we will discuss the following three topics:

1) Rostering–A Call for Action!

2) Fatigue–What to do when you’re fatigued.

3) Contract Negotiations with OSM Aviation

1) Rostering–A Call for Action!

Many of you wrote to our Company leaders telling them the hardships you’re experiencing with the current lack of flying. For those of you who said that you wanted to write in and didn’t have the email addresses to write to, we are providing you with those contacts again. The main person to email is Asgeir Nyseth, the COO of Norwegian: Asgeir.Nyseth@norwegian.com

In addition, you will want to add or “cc” the following individuals: Jan.Dahm.Simonsen@norwegian.comHelene.Loeken@norwegian.comKatarina.Finneng@norwegian.comLasse.Sandaker-Nielsen@norwegian.comEspen.Hoiby@osmaviation.com;  info@norwegianafa.org

Some of you contacted the AFA asking inquiring about what “help” may be available to you from the government because you’re having a hard time making ends meet. There are programs offered by the State of New York and State of Florida to help individuals and families who don’t make enough money to cover their bills. Some of you may qualify for these programs and you can get more information on them by clicking below:

For New York residents: https://otda.ny.gov/programs/

For Florida residents: https://dcf-access.dcf.state.fl.us/access/scrflaiewelcome.do

2) Fatigue–What to do when you’re fatigued.

According to the OM-A, “fatigue” means a physiological state of reduced mental or physical performance capability resulting from sleep loss or extended wakefullness, circadian phase, or workload (mental and/or physical activity) that can impair a crew member’s alertness and ability to safely operate an aircraft or perform safety related duties. A crew member SHALL NOT operate an aeroplane if s/he knows that s/he is suffering from or is likely to suffer from fatigue or feels unfit for flight. It is YOUR responsibility to call in fatigued if you are unit to fly–no other person or authority can do this for you as you are the best judge of what’s happening with your own body.

Fatigue must be reported by calling IOCC to have yourself removed from your assignment, followed by a SafetyNet report within 72 hours by using the category “FRF/Fatigue, NFF-Not Fit for Flight.”

3) Contract Negotiations with OSM Aviation

Your AFA Negotiations team met July 12 and 13 in Fort Lauderdale in federally supervised mediated contract negotiations.  At the session, we discussed a number of topics with the OSM Aviation including uniforms, the grievance and arbitration process, staff travel, release for union business, union security, and other articles. As stated in previous updates, our final contract will consist of 20-30 articles. In order to reach an agreement on all of these articles, we must discuss and agree to each article, one-by-one, though we can talk about more than one article at a time.

Despite being in negotiations with the OSM Aviation since February, we have made no tentative agreements on any of the articles up for discussion. This is very disappointing to us because what we are asking for in our articles is considered “industry standard” and in many cases, we are just asking for equal treatment with other employee groups in the Company. Some of you may be wondering why we continue to negotiate with OSM Aviation if no progress is being made–why can’t we negotiate directly negotiate with Norwegian since we won that right from the National Mediation Board? The answer is because Norwegian designated OSM Aviation as their legal bargaining representative and the National Mediation Board has accepted Norwegian’s decision to have OSM serve as their sole bargaining representative. If no progress continues to be made, though, the National Mediation Board has the ability to change their mind.

In our previous updates, we explained in detail the importance of having strong hotel protections and staff travel policy that all CCMs can benefit from.  In this update, we will discuss Vacation and why OSM Aviation is not treating us fairly compared with other employee groups.

One of the key issues in dispute in the vacation article is how many days of vacation a CCM should receive in a year.  Given that our European colleagues are provided with 4-6 weeks of vacation and our US-based pilots are offered 4 weeks of vacation, the amount of vacation provided to US-based CCMs is grossly inadequate by any standard. OSM Aviation is proposing that US-based CCMs maintain our current 10 days of vacation, despite giving newly hired US-based pilots 28 days of vacation.

The discussion is complicated by the fact that management is claiming that 10 days of vacation that they currently provide equals two weeks of vacation, which is obviously not correct. Now certainly for office workers or others on a Monday to Friday, 9 to 5 schedule, ten days of vacation equals two weeks of vacation because office workers don’t work the weekends.  It is universally understood in the aviation industry that for Flight Attendants and Pilots two weeks’ vacation equals 14 days.   For example, if a Flight Attendant starts vacation on a Sunday and is on vacation ten days, she or he is off vacation the following Wednesday which is a week and a half.

Another issue under discussion is how vacation get assigned. OSM Aviation is proposing that vacation be allocated on a first come basis which is not workable as we continue to grow and leaves the door open to favoritism. The AFA is proposing a bidding process where all Flight Attendants are able to bid for vacation in an orderly fashion. We believe a bidding system is the fairest way to distribute vacation and eliminates the chance of favoritism. We work hard for our vacation and deserve a fair system to get the dates we want. We are proposing that vacation be distributed by seniority which is a neutral way of distributing vacation and one which allows CCMs to select among available vacation dates.

We meet again with OSM Aviation on August 15 and 16.

We thank you for reading through this newsletter. Stay Unified. Stay Professional. Stay Courteous to each other.

Sincerely,

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC

Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted


June 20, 2017

TODAY (JUNE 20th) at FLL and TOMORROW (JUNE 21st) at JFK we are hosting our first official local council meeting as brand new AFA members. Food and drinks will be provided at both meetings. Both locations have free shuttles to/from the airport. At these meetings will be discussing current union issues and the yearly AFA budget. We will also be joined at each meeting by International Staff Representative Guy Bosworth from the AFA International Office.

The FLL base meeting will be held at the Residence Inn–Dania Beach 12PM-3PM, and this will also be a joint meeting with Council 83, which represents Silver Airways flight attendants.  The address of the Residence Inn is 4801 Anglers Avenue, Dania Beach, Florida, 33312 and the phone number is 954-989-3636.

The JFK base meeting will be held at the Hampton Inn JFK 3PM-6PM.  The address of the Hampton Inn is 144-10 135th Avenue, Jamaica, New York, 11436 and the phone number is 718-322-7500.

If you are on Standby or have the day off, we hope you can make it to one of these meetings!

Your Norwegian AFA Master Executive Council

Valentin, Katarzyna and Ted


June 18, 2017

Many of you have contacted the Union about the recently announced opportunity to operate the Company’s 737 aircraft out of Newburgh, NY (SWF) and Providence, RI (PVD). The Union has sent OSM an email asking for some clarity on some of the items, and they sent out a second email which answers most of the questions we had. The second email from OSM also highlights the fact that this will be considered a “leave of absence” from your current position instead of a “temporary base swap” as originally stated in OSM’s first email.

While the terms in the “second” email from OSM raise more questions and concerns than the first, we’re not going to tell you to completely reject the offer as we know this is something that may work out for several of you, especially at a time where our monthly rosters in the 787 Operation are suffering because of overstaffing. Before you make a final decision, the Union does want to share with you the information we’ve received so far:

1)      Taking a Leave of Absence v. Base Swap

European-based cabin crew who worked the Company’s US seasonal routes out of the Midwest and Caribbean were required by the Company to take a leave of absence from their European positions. They were told they need to take a leave of absence in order to work out of the Company’s temporary U.S. bases even though they were still flying the same aircraft and under the same AOC. In our situation, the crew who volunteer to work out of SWF and PVD are still staying within the United States so a leave of absence doesn’t seem to make sense. Some of you were more comfortable with the original idea of a base swap and so is the Union; however, the most important factor is your guaranteed return to the 787 Operation by a certain date. If this is guaranteed in writing and you are okay with the terms, rather than settling for “until the EASA Training requirement is fulfilled,” as stated in the OSM letter.

2)      Pay Rates for CCMs and SCCMs

Your pay rate in the 737 Operation should be as outlined in the first email sent by the Company where your “Base Salary” and “BLH/Flight Hour Pay” should be based on your date of hire. Your date of hire should be your original date of hire with the Company, not the date that you took the transfer to the 737 Operation. You’re still working for the same Company even though you’re required to “take leave” from one part of the operation and your date of hire should remain the same throughout all Company operations. Also, we wanted to let you know that the compensation, e.g, base salary, flight hour pay, per diem, etc. for the temporary positions in SWF and PVD offered to the European-based crews is exactly the same EXCEPT for one item: the Flight Hour Pay of SCCMs. For the U.S. crews, they’re offering SCCMS an hourly rate of $22.39 for year 2, $23.74 for year 3, $25.16 for year 4 and $27.68 for year 5. For the European crews, they’re offering SCCMs an hourly rate of $30.39 for year 2, $31.74 for year 3, $33.16 for year 4, and $35.68 for year 5. The Union’s position is that the pay for SCCMs should be the same and if you are thinking about serving as an SCCM in SWF and PVD, you should not sign an agreement that pays you substantially less than our European counterparts.

3)      Not being required to obtain union membership with the IAM

The Company states in their second letter that you will be employed under the terms and conditions of the Collective Bargaining Agreement with the IAM; however, since the position is temporary (2 months) you should not be obligated to sign up for membership with the IAM. According to the agreement with the IAM, you will not be required to obtain union membership until you’re employed at least 60 days with “OSM Short Haul.” Not only is singing up for Union Membership with the IAM going to complicate things for you legally as an AFA member but if you sign up for membership with the IAM you will be required to pay an initiation fee and union dues. This is why it’s so important as we stated above in #1 that you obtain a written guarantee of your return date to the 787 Operation. You should also require in your agreement with the Company that you will not be required to join another union (the IAM) while you serve in this temporary position, unless of course you volunteer to stay longer.

We hope the above facts help you make an informed decision. Again, we know that this opportunity is not for everyone but we appreciate the fact that some of you may be able to benefit from it.

If you have any other questions, please contact the Union at info@norwegianafa.org

In Unity,

Your Norwegian AFA Master Executive Council

Valentin, Katarzyna and Ted


June 16, 2017

Dear AFA Member,

Since we started the Long Haul operation in the United States, there has been one consistent issue that every crew member has struggled with at one time or another—our rosters. We’ve talked endlessly about how we’re the only US-based flight attendants unable to bid for our schedules and while this issue still remains of utmost importance, we must take action now to stop to a trend that’s affecting all of us on a consistent basis. We must call on our leaders in the Company to put an end to the intentional over-hiring of crew while the existing crew are struggling to pay our bills.

To be clear, hiring new employees is exciting and essential to a healthy work environment. Hiring more employees at this stage in the game without additional flying is hurting existing employees to the point where some of us are forced to get second jobs or consider employment elsewhere. Additionally, our work culture suffers and we become bitter about our jobs, develop negative feelings for the Company, and take our frustrations out on the passengers.

We have told you that until we have a Union Contract, there’s nothing the Union could do to force the Company to change the way it operates, but we do have something just as powerful: our Unity. The grass-roots efforts we have launched in recent years has paved the way for all of the improvements in our terms and conditions and ultimately led to the formation of our Union. Right now, our best chance at enacting any improvement to our rosters is by sending hundreds of messages from you, the rank-and-file employees, directly to our Company’s top leadership. The main person to email is Asgeir Nyseth: Asgeir.Nyseth@norwegian.com

In addition, you will want to add or “cc” the following individuals: Jan.Dahm.Simonsen@norwegian.comHelene.Loeken@norwegian.comKatarina.Finneng@norwegian.comLasse.Sandaker-Nielsen@norwegian.comEspen.Hoiby@osmaviation.com;  info@norwegianafa.org

For those of you who aren’t aware, Asgeir is the Chief Operations Officer for the Norwegian Group and is the Accountable Manager of NAS. Asgeir was also responsible for starting the Long Haul Operation. Asgeir has also spoken to many of you during his long stay at the Copthorne Hotel and asked you to write to him personally about the issues you felt were important to us. Unfortunately, Asgeir never got these emails he asked us for. Essentially, we sent the message that we’re “all talk” in person and that our issues aren’t important enough to put down in writing. The other emails above are the Company’s Communications and HR leaders and it’s very important we include them because they need to know that “not all is well” in the Long Haul operation. The CEO of OSM should be copied because he also needs to know the seriousness of the situation the US-based employees. Finally, you want to include the Union on any email you send the Company so when we sit down with them we can tell them how many messages were sent on this issue.

When sending your letter, be 100% honest about what impact our rostering system has had on your life personally. If you are thinking about leaving the Company–say it! You are only being truthful and it helps convey the seriousness of the situation. If you need help with trying to formulate your thoughts, you can use the following talking points:

  1. Rostering has been a concern of the cabin crew since we started the operation.
  2. We are told in our yearly base visits by Norwegian AND OSM Management that “things are going to improve” but they haven’t improved and continue to get worse.
  3. OSM has attempted to make modifications by making small increases in certain areas but it’s still not enough for us to make a living and most importantly, OSM does not make the rosters–Norwegian does.
  4. The Company says publicly that we’re paid “competitive wages” but this only holds true if our rosters contain excess flying. The truth is that right now, we’re one of the lowest paid flight attendants in the United States.

While there are no guarantees about the outcome of your letter, take some comfort in knowing that you stepped up and actually did something about a problem instead of venting to your colleagues on the plane or on Facebook.

Finally, some of you messaged us asking what “help” may be available to you from the government because you’re having a hard time making ends meet. There are programs offered by the State of New York and Florida to help individuals and families who don’t make enough money to cover their bills. Some of you may qualify for these programs and you can get more information on them by clicking below:

For New York residents: https://otda.ny.gov/programs/

For Florida residents: https://dcf-access.dcf.state.fl.us/access/scrflaiewelcome.do

Taking charge of your future also means attending union meetings when possible. We know our schedules are sometimes hectic but if you have the day off, please attend the upcoming Union Meeting in FLL (June 20th) or JFK (June 21st). The FLL base meeting will be held on June 20th at the Residence Inn–Dania Beach 12PM-3PM, and this will also be a joint meeting with another new AFA council: Silver Airways flight attendants.  The JFK base meeting will be held on June 21st at the Hampton Inn JFK 3PM-6PM.  Both locations have free shuttles to/from the airport.

In Unity,

Your Norwegian AFA Master Executive Council

Valentin, Katarzyna and Ted


June 10, 2017

Dear AFA Member,

The items discussed in this Union update are:

  1. Negotiations Update (and discussion on Staff Travel)
  2. Random Drug Tests and Flight Attendant Drug and Alcohol Program (FADAP)
  3. *Save the Date* Union Meetings in FLL (June 20th) and JFK (June 21st)
  4. OSM’s 401(k) plan

 

1)      Negotiations Update (and discussion on Staff Travel)

The Company and the Union met for collective bargaining June 7-8 in Fort Lauderdale. The articles we have discussed since collective bargaining began in February are: Crew Bases, Hotels and Layover Requirements, Vacation, Health and Safety, Seniority, Grievances, Staff Travel, and Uniforms. As stated before in previous updates, the most important items of our collective bargaining agreement (compensation and rostering) will be discussed toward the end of negotiations.

Some progress was made at our most recent bargaining session this week but nothing has been tentatively agreed to. As discussed in previous updates, the Company has pushed back on many issues which are important to the Cabin Crew. In our last newsletter update, we discussed one of the issues (Hotels) and why it’s important for the cabin crew to have contract language to ensure certain hotel standards are being met and that the crew hotel is in a suitable location.

One of the other articles up for discussion is the Staff Travel article. This is an important area for cabin crew members because it’s the reason why many of us got a job with an airline in the first place.

One of the main issues when discussing Staff Travel is the Company’s unwillingness to enter into formal agreements with other carriers, which would be of little to no cost to the Company. We cannot force the Company to make agreements but we expect them to at least start the discussion.

One of the other key issues is “fairness.” We are proposing that the Company will offer our cabin crew the same benefits they offer to other employee groups. In the past month, the Company has moved in the right direction by publicly announcing enhanced travel benefits for the 787 crews and we will continue pressing the Company for an agreement in writing.  We remain optimistic that we can come to an agreement on Staff Travel soon.

We meet again with the Company July 12-13.

 

2)      Random Bag Checks and Random Drug Tests

The Company continues to require the US-based crew to undergo random bag checks and random drug tests. While these searches are LEGAL here in the United States, the Union has complained to the Company that the random drug tests are being required on a day off with no extra compensation. The last we heard about these tests is that they are being administered to the crew right after arriving at home base.

In addition, we are still trying to figure out the legalities of performing these searches in Europe, specifically for our European based colleagues who also work for the Company. To date, we have confirmed that the LGW based crews are being required to undergo random bag checks and drug tests, but that the BCN and BKK crews have not.

We want to emphasize that taking any illegal drugs and alcohol while on duty is of course, illegal, and you will be fired if you test positive on a drug or alcohol test. We are aware that some U.S. carriers have negotiated special “last chance” agreements with the Union for certain employees who test positive on their drug or alcohol tests, but such a program does not exist here. If you have a substance abuse problem you should seek help NOW by calling your insurance company or the AFA Flight Attendant Drug and Alcohol Program (855) 333-2327 www.fadap.org

There is a misconception in the airline industry that saying “you have a problem” when you are given notice of a required drug test will save your job and this is simply not the case. If you don’t seek help beforehand and it comes time for you to be tested, it’s too late. Refusing to take a test is the same as testing positive and you will lose your job.

If you are a recovering addict, you have the opportunity to help your colleagues free themselves from addiction by becoming a FADAP Representative. Please contact the Union at the email or phone number listed at the bottom of this email if you are interested.

 

3)        *Save the Date* Union Meetings in FLL (June 20th) and JFK (June 21st)

In 10 days we are hosting our very first official local council meeting as brand new AFA members. The FLL base meeting will be held on June 20th at the Residence Inn–Dania Beach 12PM-3PM, and this will also be a joint meeting with another new AFA council: Silver Airways flight attendants.  The JFK base meeting will be held on June 21st at the Hampton Inn JFK 3PM-6PM.  Both locations have free shuttles to/from the airport.

 

4)        OSM’s 401(k) plan

Many of you are concerned about retirement and rightfully so. If you are close to retirement age, you have less time to put money aside than most. If you are young, you have even more to worry about because the need for millennials to save for retirement is greater now than ever.

One of the things you may be thinking (if you haven’t already done so) is signing up for the 401(k) plan offered by the OSM. While some retirement is better than no retirement, your financial advisor may tell you that contributing to a 401(k) without a company-provided match is a bad idea. Currently, OSM does not provide a company match with their 401(k) plan.

One of the reasons why contributing to a 401(k) plan with no matching company contribution is a poor choice is because if 401(k) plans are based on the stock market and no match means that it’s only made up from your contributions. If the stock market drops significantly, so the money you contributed. If a 401(k) plan consisted of a company-match, any drop in the stock market would still cost you money, but it wouldn’t be all of your money—any drop in the market would be cushioned by the matching company contribution where you are still likely to come out “ahead.” And of course, if the stock market were to rise, you’d be earning a return based on the money you put in AND the matching contribution from the company.

Since OSM’s 401(k) plan doesn’t offer a match, a smarter decision would be to invest in a Roth IRA. The Roth IRA is one of the best (if not the best) investments for Americans making less than $100,000 a year. You can read more about Roth IRAs here:

http://www.rothira.com/blog/hacking-retirement-the-unique-tax-benefits-of-roth-iras

https://www.fool.com/retirement/iras/2015/08/04/the-5-best-roth-ira-benefits.aspx

As always, you should consult a financial advisor before making any major financial decisions.

We thank you for reading through this newsletter. Stay Unified. Stay Professional. Stay Courteous to each other.

Sincerely,

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC

Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted


May 20, 2017

Dear AFA Member,

The items discussed in this Union update are:

  1. NCCA transfer of Union Certification to AFA-CWA is official
  2. Negotiations Talk (Hotels and Layover Requirements & Negotiations Survey)
  3. *Save the Date* Union Meetings in FLL (June 20th) and JFK (June 21st)
  4. Random Bag Checks and Random Drug Tests

 

1)      NCCA transfer of Union Certification to AFA-CWA is official

The majority of our workgroup voted to join the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA in an election held on March 30th. The following day, we sent a request to the National Mediation Board to transfer NCCA’s union certification to AFA-CWA. The Company filed an objection with the NMB alleging that the vote was done improperly and made an additional submissions asking the NMB to reconsider the transfer of certification. The transfer of certification was not issued last month as it should have been because the NMB had to review both of the Company’s objections. On May 17th, the NMB determined that the Company’s claims were baseless and granted our request to transfer NCCA’s union certification to AFA-CWA. The NMB’s letter granting our request can be found here: NCCA-AFA Transfer of Certification

The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA is now duly designated as the certified bargaining representative of the US-based cabin crew members of Norwegian. Even though we are now officially AFA, your elected NCCA Union Leaders Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted, have now become AFA Leaders continue to lead our workgroup.

In the next couple of weeks, you will receive a welcome packet in the mail along with an AFA pin and membership application. It’s very important to fill out the membership application the moment you get it. Not only will becoming an official AFA member make you eligible for special union discounts and scholarship programs, but you must be an AFA member in order to vote for union leaders and most importantly vote on our Contract when it’s finally negotiated. Filling out the AFA membership application does not cost anything. As we stated before, AFA will not require our workgroup to pay ANY union dues until we negotiate our first contract.

 

2)      Negotiations Talk (Hotels and Layover Requirements & Negotiations Survey)

As we have previously reported, we have met with Management several times to negotiate a contract for our workgroup. So far, we have discussed eight articles of the agreement.

One of the articles up for discussion is the Hotel and Layover Requirements article.  This is an extremely important area for cabin crew members as we spend much of our working life in hotels. The quality and location of our layover hotels is critical.

One of the key issues in our bargaining is the location of our layover hotels, especially for stays of more than one night.  Staying out by the airport in an area with no amenities is not acceptable.  We are proposing that on long layovers the hotel must be in a Downtown or Tourist Zone location whereas on short overnights, of course, we could just stay out by the airport. Our proposal is entirely reasonable and is line with other international air carriers.

Management has resisted our proposals to this point and appears to take the position that cost should be the only factor, rather than satisfaction of the crew or fairness should dictate our hotel locations.   Other issues we are proposing include basic standards for the quality of hotel including cleanliness and eating facilities.   We are also advocating for more substantial food discounts at layover hotels, as well as a hotel cancellation policy.

Norwegian cabin crew members deserve basic standards of overnight accommodations.   To achieve these basic protections afforded other cabin crew members it is important that we as a workgroup remain unified.  Please discuss these issues with your flying partners and let’s send a strong message to Management that we deserve better.  In future updates, we will address other issues important to us such as uniforms and health care benefits.

Finally, many of you have told your Union Leaders that you’ve not had the chance to take the Negotiations Survey that came out earlier this year because you forgot or because some of you weren’t hired yet. We are happy to announce that you now have one more chance to take the Survey and you can access it by clicking on the following link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZFLT397

 

3)      *Save the Date* Union Meetings in FLL (June 20th) and JFK (June 21st)

Next month, we hosting our very first official local council meeting as brand new AFA members. The FLL base meeting will be held on June 20th at the Residence Inn–Dania Beach, and this will also be a joint meeting with another new AFA council: Silver Airways flight attendants.  The JFK base meeting will be held on June 21st near JFK but location has not yet been determined.  If you are JFK based and have any suggestions on what would be most convenient for the JFK crew, please send us an email: info@norwegianafa.org

 

4)      Random Bag Checks and Random Drug Tests

As stated in our last Union Update, Management has started performing random bag checks after the completing of pairings into home base. We have also learned that Management has resumed the practice of randomly selecting crew members for drug tests on their days off. While random bag checks and drug tests are common at other US carriers, they are illegal in Europe. Right now, it appears that only the US-based crew members are being targeted for these events and the Union has requested more information from Management. The Union takes issue with the fact that the US crew members are not being compensated for the tests whatsoever (no bought day off compensation and not being offered an extra day off), all while being threatened to take these tests “within 48 hours or be terminated.” Be rest assured that your Union is working on addressing this issue right now and we will be updating you with more information shortly.

 

We thank you for reading through this newsletter. Stay Unified. Stay Professional. Stay Courteous to each other.

Sincerely,

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC

Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted

 


May 1, 2017

Dear Union Member,

Happy International Workers’ Day! In this Newsletter, you’ll find the following items:

1) Negotiations Update

2) Conflicts with coworkers—Professional Standards

3) Random Bag Checks by Management

4) Union Information Representatives “Info Reps”

5) Rumor Control

6) Management still retains the right to make positive changes

1) Negotiations Update

The Union and the Management met for collective bargaining April 26th and 27th in Fort Lauderdale. The meeting was presided over by Federal mediator Anthony Tosi from the National Mediation Board. The representatives of the Union were Valentin Lorien, Katarzyna Mroczek, Theodore Pavlik, and AFA’s Executive Director of Collective Bargaining, Joe Burns. The representatives for Management were HR Manager of OSM, Phil Villani and Business Manager of OSM, Beate Jakobsen.

The following articles were passed across the table and discussed: Crew Bases, Grievance Procedures, Hotel and Layover Requirements, Seniority, Staff Travel, System Board of Adjustment, Uniforms, and Vacation. Progress was made on some articles, but not others. While we have not tentatively agreed to anything yet, the overall tone at the table has been the best it’s been so far. It’s apparent that Management is becoming more accepting of the Union and in turn.

The collective bargaining sessions scheduled for May were cancelled because of the imminent threat of the government shutdown, where the mediator was not able to commit to the date. To make up for the lost session, we scheduled an additional session in June. Our upcoming meetings with Management are: June 7th & 8th, 21st & 22nd, and July 11-13th.

Even though we have not come to an agreement on any articles as of yet, we will continue to strive to reach an agreement that is fair for our workgroup. Despite the fact there are no collective bargaining sessions scheduled this month, your Union leaders are going to use this opportunity work on our current proposals, draft new proposals, and conduct research and training.

2) Conflicts with coworkers—Professional Standards

Problems can occur among coworkers, especially here at our Company where Management has promoted individuals who are not properly suited to fulfill leadership positions. There are some situations that leave you no choice but to report certain behaviors, like harassment, to Management. If you have been harassed, you must fill out a SafetyNet report. SafetyNet is the only way to legally ensure your concern is documented, notifies Norwegian that there is a problem, and prevents base management from sweeping complaints about certain individuals “under the rug.”

If you have a conflict with, or concern about, a flying partner that is less severe can be taken care of by talking to someone, AFA provides us with a free resource that’s a part of the Employee Assistance Program called Professional Standards.

Whenever you are involved in a professional standards matter, you are encouraged to address the issue in a reasonable and timely manner. To do this, an EAP representative can help you with: defusing the situation, thinking through the conflict or concern, exploring the outcome you seek, and identifying who and how to best approach the issue. You can reach an EAP representative 24/7 by calling 202-434-0560. If you have any doubt about who to turn to, you are always encouraged to contact the Union.

3) Random Bag Checks by Management

There have been recent reports of Management conducting random bag checks upon arrival into the US to look for items potentially taken from the aircraft. We are aware that these searches are embarrassing and time consuming, but the more quickly Management finds nothing in your bag, the faster you’ll be on your way.

Although the US constitution includes a right to privacy and prohibits unreasonable searches, these protections don’t extend to private (that is, nongovernmental) workplaces. Since we work for a private employer, Management has the right to search our bags and this is common practice at US airlines. Because we don’t have a Union Contract, there are no specific terms or conditions by which these searches are performed. Until then, it’s not unreasonable to ask Management to have a “private screening” away from view of the passengers and other crew members, as some of us have private items we do not want others to see.

4) Union Information Representatives “Info Reps”

We had a good showing of interest for the Info Rep program and we encourage you to volunteer if you haven’t done so already. The Union “Info Rep” position is open to all US-based cabin crew who have a passion for their jobs, their colleagues, and their futures here at Norwegian. The only requirement for this position is that you make yourself available for a few minutes each week to read the latest union updates, make an effort to attend the weekly Info Rep Conference Call.

5) Rumor Control

Rumors will always be a part of our jobs and the airline industry. At companies like Norwegian, where much information is absent, employees make up their own information and that information soon snowballs into full-blown rumors. When some rumors are ignored—like those concerning job security—they increase employee concerns. Going forward, we want you assure you that any information the Union comes across that remotely affects our jobs, the Union will communicate this information to everyone. If you hear of any information that you’re unsure about, please contact the Union ASAP so we can get the facts to you.

6) Management still retains the right to make positive changes

We have been hearing from some of our members that Management is trying to use “the Union” as a reason to not help you by saying “you have to go through the Union for this.” This simply isn’t true. Management still maintains the ability to help their employees and implement changes (e.g. 401(k) match, a top out longer than 4 years, etc.) that will benefit our workgroup and retain quality employees. If you are provided this excuse by Management, tell them that they still retain the ability to make changes and then press them for an answer.

We thank you for reading through this newsletter. Stay Unified. Stay Professional. Stay Courteous to each other.

Sincerely,

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC

Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted

 


April 9, 2017

In this Newsletter, you’ll find the following items:

1) Negotiations Update

2) AFA Membership Application and Union Pins

3) AFA-CWA Scholarships

4) UnionPlus Benefits

5) AFA Employee Assistance Program

6) Union Information Representatives “Info Reps”

Negotiations Update

The Union and Management met on April 5th and 6th to continue collective bargaining. The last time we sat down with Management in February, we passed across four (4) articles: Hotels and Layovers, Staff Travel, Bases and Transfers, and Seniority. The Union received Management’s counter proposal to all four articles and it appears we are very far apart on all issues. Nevertheless, we made it clear to Management that we are eager to reach an agreement and we passed across four (4) more articles: Uniforms, Vacation, Grievance Procedures, and System Board of Adjustment. The last two articles, Grievance Procedures and System Board of Adjustment may sound foreign to you, but they are standard procedures found in every airline contract and are essential in helping the Union disputes between the Union and Management on your behalf.

We meet again with Management on April 26th and 27th and hope to receive counter proposals that we can tentatively agree on.

AFA Membership Applications and Union Pins

In the next week we will be sending out membership applications and AFA pins to your home address. When you receive your membership application, please sign it and send it back in the enclosed envelope. When you receive your AFA pin, please put it on your uniform jacket as soon as you receive it. At the end of the month, we will be sending out official notification that the NCCA pin is to no longer be worn with the uniform.

AFA-CWA Scholarships

If you haven’t already done so, please visit the AFA website to read more about the scholarships they offer you and your dependents attending college or university. The deadline for the AFA scholarship is tomorrow April 10, 2017 and the deadline for the CWA “Joe Beirne” Scholarship is April 29th. Details for both scholarships can be found here: http://www.afacwa.org/scholarships and http://www.cwa-union.org/pages/beirne

UnionPlus Benefits

After you submit your membership application to the AFA, you will receive a member number. With this number you can access the many discounts available through UnionPlus.

AFA Employee Assistance Program

Effective immediately, you may utilize the AFA’s Employee Assistance Program. AFA’s nationally acclaimed EAP provides free services to flight attendants, their families, and partners. Everyone experiences personal or work-related problems from time to time. Sometimes our own resources or sup­port systems just aren’t enough. We could all benefit from assistance from another source – one that you can trust and rely on for help. EAP can help you with: Relationship issues, family concerns, physical and emotional health concerns, stress, chemical dependency (e.g. drugs and alcohol), financial difficulties, and legal matters. EAP can help you deal with critical incidents or traumatic events you experience, whether at work or out of work.

EAP can also help you deal with problems among coworkers. There is an alternative to making a report to management if you have a conflict with, or concern about, a flying partner. Whenever you are involved in a professional standards matter, you are encouraged to address the issue in a reasonable and timely manner. Your EAP representative can help you with defusing the situation and achieving the outcome you desire.

Do you see a colleague who needs help but you just don’t know how to approach them. Call the EAP now to get them the help they need.

How do I access the EAP? Call the International helpline at 1-800-424-2406 or 202-434-0560 to help you access services.

Union Information Representatives “Info Reps”

We had a good showing of interest for the Info Rep program and we encourage you to volunteer if you haven’t done so already. The Union “Info Rep” position is open to all US-based cabin crew who have a passion for their jobs, their colleagues, and their futures here at Norwegian. The only requirement for this position is that you make yourself available for a few minutes each week to read the latest union updates, make an effort to attend the weekly Info Rep Conference Call.

Thank you for reading this newsletter in its entirety. We plan on sending out another newsletter after our next negotiations session at the end of this month.

Sincerely,

Your AFA Norwegian Air MEC

Valentin, Katarzyna, and Ted